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Be still my beating heart! Free software. And worth every penny, too!

These are the software equivalents of finger exercises, not symphonies or even pop songs. Still, you might find one useful.

Time Zone Clock

You can download the program here. You can download the (AGPL3) source code here.

The program requires the Microsoft .NET Framework, version 3.5 or above.

Geographically distributed organizations frequently span time zones. While scheduling programs typically can express meeting times in multiple time zones, they typically do not tell you the current time in other time zones, or tell you what time a proposed meeting would be in other time zones. This small utility does both.

As far as usage information goes, remember that as the great Alistair Dabbs at The Register put it, the current fashion in software is “forcing users to wander aimlessly around freakishly arcane graphic user interfaces while right-clicking on things and hoping for the best, like some fucked-up business edition of Riven.”

Talk Timer

You can download the program here. You can download the (AGPL3) source code here.

The program requires either the Microsoft .NET Framework, version 2.0 or above, or the Mono runtime.

Some meetings have “time boxed” discussions (I’m looking at you, Agile), where the intent is to limit discussion of a topic to a particular amount of time. The talk timer application can aid in this discussion limiting. The application displays the amount of time remaining in a discussion period in minutes and seconds in large digits; when the amount of time has expired, the time display turns red and the system sound (typically a beep or ding) is sounded. The time display is set to be a topmost window, so it remains visible while other applications are displayed. The amount of time in the time period can be set to any whole number of minutes by controls below the time display, or to common small amounts of time by individual buttons beside the time display.

When time remains in the time period, the timer looks like this:

When the time period has expired, the timer looks like this:

Dozenal Clock

You can download the program here. You can download the (AGPL3) source code here.

The program requires either the Microsoft .NET Framework, version 2.0 or above, or the Mono runtime.

Introduction

The Dozenal Clock application displays the current time and date in dozenal (base 1210) and in decimal (base 1010) on Windows and Linux systems. It has options so you can choose whether the date is displayed, the length of the time periods measured in the dozenal display, whether third-level divisions of the time are to be displayed, and the shape of the digit dek.

By default, the program window looks like this:

This displays the current date in both dozenal (with year, month, and day numbers separated by radix points) and decimal (with year, month, and day separated by hyphens), the current time in both dozenal fractions of a day and decimal hours, minutes, and seconds, and finally using the (7-segment approximation of the) rotated 2 form of the digit dek.

Options

Selecting the program window (by, for example, clicking on it) and entering the key “V” (for view) will show the view options window. This window looks like this:

The options allow you to choose the shape of the digit dek, the type of time shown, whether the date is to be shown, and whether the seconds (and dozenal equivalent) are to be shown.

The digit dek has two common forms, one a script capital X and one a rotated digit 2. The clock display stylistically emulates a multi-digit seven-segment LED or LCD display. The limitations of a seven-segment display mean either digit form can be represented only in spirit. The typical seven-segment representation of the digit 2 is identical to its rotation, so the rotated digit 2 of dek is modified by dropping the top segment. The resulting shape resembles the lowercase letter “d,” providing a convenient mnemonic for the digit name dek. The seven-segment approximation of the letter X is perhaps less successful, appearing identical to the uppercase letter “H.” No convenient mnemonic suggests itself for this case.

The time format “E.EE.EE” shows the time of day as three or five dozenal digits. The first digit represents periods of 0.112 day, or 2 traditional hours; these time units might be called dours, for dozenal hours or double hours. The next two digits represent periods of 0.0112 of the first period, or periods of 4212 (5010) traditional seconds; these time units might be called dinits, for dozenal minutes. The final two digits, if present, represent periods of 0.0112 of the second period, or 0.4212 (0.3472+10) traditional seconds; these time units might be called deconds, for dozenal seconds.

The time format “1E.EE.EE” shows the time of day as two or three groups of two dozenal digits. The first group represents periods of 0.0612 day, or 1 traditional hour. The next group shows periods of 2112 (2510) traditional seconds. The final group, if present, shows periods of 0.2112 (0.1736+10) seconds.

The time format “1E.4E.4E” shows the time of day as two or three groups of two dozenal digits. The first group measures traditional hours, the second traditional minutes, and the last (if present) traditional seconds.

The date can be omitted from the clock display by unchecking the “Show: Date” checkbox. The seconds and third group of dozenal digits con be omitted from the clock display by unchecking the “Show: Deconds/Seconds” checkbox.

After making your selections, click the OK button to apply them, or the red X button in the top right to cancel them. You can change your selections at any time by entering “V” when the program form is selected. Your choices are saved when the program exits, and reapplied when the program next starts.

Selecting the display options can substantially change the look of the clock. For example, omitting the date and the seconds, and using the “1E.EE.EE” time format, makes the program window look like this: